At Brooklyn’s BUKA, Nigerian Authenticity Is On the Menu



a bunch of different types of food on a table: At Brooklyn's BUKA, Nigerian Authenticity Is On the Menu


© Joy Nnenna/Shutterstock
At Brooklyn’s BUKA, Nigerian Authenticity Is On the Menu

This story is part of an ongoing series in honor of Black History Month on the diversity, roots and evolution of Black cooking and cuisine in America.

If ever there was evidence that West African food is hitting the mainstream in America, it’s the fact that fufu videos are blowing up on Tik Tok. A staple throughout countries like Ghana and Nigeria, fufu — which means mash or mix — is a stretchy, doughy food made from boiled and pounded starch like yam, plantains or cassava.

But for Lookman Afolayan, chef and owner of BUKA in Brooklyn, New York, West African cuisine isn’t some trend to be chased. The 53-year-old Nigeria-born chef opened his restaurant in 2009, well before there was Tik Tok. For him, the food of his homeland is like music.

“Do you see the

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Most people don’t know how to safely cook chicken to prevent food poisoning. Here’s how to do it right.

Cooked chicken. <p class="copyright">AP/Larry Crowe</p>
Cooked chicken.
  • Undercooked chicken is a common source of food poisoning.

  • If you’re cooking chicken at home, checking the color or texture is a common way of assessing whether it’s safe to eat.

  • But new research finds that those methods don’t actually work, since pathogens can still be present in chicken that looks or feels cooked. Even meat thermometers aren’t always reliable, the study found.

  • Experts recommend thoroughly cooking all surfaces of the meat to eliminate bacteria and other potential contaminants. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Chicken is one of the most common ingredients in kitchens around the world — millions of us eat it for dinner at least once a week.

If that’s you, you may be familiar with the classic techniques to make sure you don’t get sick: check it’s not pink on the inside, check the texture of the meat has long, thin

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Black-owned food businesses around Evansville and Henderson areas

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — In honor of Black History Month, we’ve rounded up food businesses owned by Black entrepreneurs in the Evansville and Henderson area.

Whether you’re looking for an elegant in-home dinner, a cooking class, barbecue, fun food truck fare, a vegan entrée or dessert, pizza, exotic Caribbean cuisine, homey comfort food or an upscale appetizer and a glass of wine, you’ll find someone on this list who offers it.

If we’ve missed one, let us know. Reach out to [email protected] and we’ll add them.

HENDERSON, KY.

John Earl’s Ice House and Fine Foods

733 Martin Luther King Blvd.; 270-854-4798

A fully-dressed triple cheeseburger from John Earl's with lettuce, pickle, tomato, onion, mayo, mustard and ketchup.

John Earl’s, owned and run by John and Carmalita McFarland, is a tiny walk-up restaurant offering casual food favorites such as fried appetizers, burgers, wings, barbecue sandwiches, tenderloins, catfish and chicken salad. The house-made cole slaw is a favorite side. Soft serve ice cream may be enjoyed in a

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I’ve learned to become more ‘guarded’

Nigella Lawson
Nigella Lawson

Celebrity cook Nigella Lawson has made a career out of sharing – food, yes, but also much more.

In the opening scenes of her TV cooking debut in Nigella Bites in 1999 she’s seen hurrying her young son to and from nursery, wheeling him around a supermarket in a trolley, and splashing him in the bath.

In many of her shows you’d be just as likely to see Lawson helping her children with their homework or inviting friends over for dinner, as catch her sneaking to the fridge in her nightwear to devour a sugar-laden leftover.

Nigella&#39;s Cook, Eat, Repeat
Nigella Lawson’s most recent TV show has been Nigella: Cook, Eat, Repeat, was made alone in lockdown

“I didn’t think it was an odd thing to do,” she says of her willingness to open a door on her private life in those shows.

Now however things have changed, she adds: “I would

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