Smitten Kitchen Has a Clever Trick For Making the Best Tomato Soup Ever

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If you’re a fan of cooking, chances are you’re familiar with Smitten Kitchen. The longtime food blog created by Deb Perelman is beloved by many for its simple-yet-comforting recipes that are always a success. I’ve written about my love for her recipes in the past, and whenever I’m searching for a new recipe to make, Smitten Kitchen is one of the first places I turn.

One Smitten Kitchen recipe I’ve made countless times is her classic grilled cheese and cream of tomato soup. The soup (which is a simplified version of a recipe from The America’s Test Kitchen Cookbook) is rich, comforting, and super-flavorful, thanks to a clever trick developed by the America’s Test Kitchen team. It’s one of those cold-weather recipes I make every time the temperature drops below

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Cooking in Quarantine: Saransh Goila on connecting through food | Features News

I started cooking when I was 12 years old for a very simple reason – the joy people would share over a good meal was unmatched and I just wanted to add to that emotion. Today, the situation we are in reminds me of why I started to cook before it became my business and my passion changed to my profession. 

While we cannot sit and eat together today, in the digitised world we live in we can still cook together and share our meals by having conversations around them. It is important to keep our spirits alive while we are isolated at home and to find joy in our daily lives and meals which otherwise can be monotonous. 

Professionally, this is the toughest time I have seen in my life. Like many of us in the hospitality industry, I have realised the only way to cope is to cook

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Padma Lakshmi Embedded With Immigrant Chefs to Tell the Real Story of American Food

Photo credit: Hulu
Photo credit: Hulu

From Esquire

Photo credit: Hulu
Photo credit: Hulu

You’d be hard-pressed to find a longer resume in the world of food journalism—or even entertainment—right now than that of Padma Lakshmi. An Emmy-winning TV host, she’s also a cookbook author, a venerable producer, and a powerful activist. Her reign on Top Chef as a host and a judge, plus an EP, is nearing 15 years, and in 2009, she co-founded the Endometriosis Foundation of America. She works with both the United Nations Development Program and serves as an ambassador to the ACLU. And if you’re wondering who currently serves as the mayor of Twitter, look no further than her inspiring, occasionally incendiary, feed.

It’s an incredibly wide range, and it all informs her addictive, compelling new show, Taste the Nation. The 10-episode series, which she developed, produced, and hosts, debuts Thursday on Hulu. The driving question, as

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At Brooklyn’s KOKOMO, the diversity and harmony of Caribbean food are on full display

This story is part of an ongoing series in honor of Black History Month on the diversity, roots and evolution of Black cooking and cuisine in America.

When you think of Caribbean food, what do you think of? Jerk chicken? Beef patties? Plantains, perhaps? If that’s the case, you’re not wrong. But the culture — and the food — of the dozens of countries and thousands of islands within the Caribbean Sea is remarkably diverse and encompasses so much more than that.

Caribbean food is a reflection of its Indigineous, African and colonial roots. Beginning in the 15th century, islands of the Caribbean were colonized by the Spanish, Dutch, French and English, who in turn brought enslaved people from West Africa to work the sugar cane plantations. Immigrants from across Asia, particularly China and India, and the Middle East also began to occupy the region. The culinary traditions from these

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