Piedmont Earth Day Fair highlights everyday actions we can all do

magenet

[ad_1]

The Piedmont Environmental Alliance hosted its first in-person Earth Day Fair in three years Saturday. PEA executive director Jamie Maier got emotional seeing the hundreds of people walking through the Winston-Salem Fairgrounds, visiting exhibitors from around the region.”I feel choked up,” Maier said. “It’s been a tough two years for all of us in different ways. So much of what we believe is that people and partnerships and coming together is the way that we make change and the way we build a better community and region. So seeing people together, it’s just so much easier to do it in person.”Those in-person visitors got to see a wide variety of demonstrations on ways to live more sustainably, like low-hassle composting and creating pollinator-friendly landscapes. Kids also got to be eye-to-eye with unique creatures, from owls and snakes to bees and even a robot! “We know that when we teach kids to care about our planet, that has impacts lasting throughout their lifetime,” Maier said. “It’s important for kids to learn to love the earth, to get dirty, to enjoy the planet. And it’s just as important to families and older folks, as well.”The main takeaway for anyone, whether at the fair or not, is to learn how to love and protect our planet, according to Maier. She recommends thinking critically about how to reduce your carbon footprint on an every day level.”We all need the things that the Earth provides and climate change is a real existential threat to the way that we’re all living,” she said. “We can all do small things and big things to take care of each other and our community.”Check out the Piedmont Environmental Alliance for tips and other events they hold throughout the year at www.peanc.org.

The Piedmont Environmental Alliance hosted its first in-person Earth Day Fair in three years Saturday. PEA executive director Jamie Maier got emotional seeing the hundreds of people walking through the Winston-Salem Fairgrounds, visiting exhibitors from around the region.

“I feel choked up,” Maier said. “It’s been a tough two years for all of us in different ways. So much of what we believe is that people and partnerships and coming together is the way that we make change and the way we build a better community and region. So seeing people together, it’s just so much easier to do it in person.”

Those in-person visitors got to see a wide variety of demonstrations on ways to live more sustainably, like low-hassle composting and creating pollinator-friendly landscapes. Kids also got to be eye-to-eye with unique creatures, from owls and snakes to bees and even a robot!

“We know that when we teach kids to care about our planet, that has impacts lasting throughout their lifetime,” Maier said. “It’s important for kids to learn to love the earth, to get dirty, to enjoy the planet. And it’s just as important to families and older folks, as well.”

The main takeaway for anyone, whether at the fair or not, is to learn how to love and protect our planet, according to Maier. She recommends thinking critically about how to reduce your carbon footprint on an every day level.

“We all need the things that the Earth provides and climate change is a real existential threat to the way that we’re all living,” she said. “We can all do small things and big things to take care of each other and our community.”

Check out the Piedmont Environmental Alliance for tips and other events they hold throughout the year at www.peanc.org.

[ad_2]

Source link

Next Post

Beginner's Guide to Sourdough Focaccia Bread

[ad_1] Learn how to make THE BEST easy sourdough focaccia bread (step-by-step recipe!) with bubbly, active sourdough starter, a simple overnight option, and tips for par-baking the dough. So soft! So fluffy! Focaccia recipe adapted from my book: Artisan Sourdough Made Simple. If you’re new to sourdough bread, or want […]
Sourdough focaccia