Hunger Is A Form Of Violence We Must Address

(Photo: YENWEI LIU / HUFFPOST)
(Photo: YENWEI LIU / HUFFPOST)

This Voices In Food story, as told to Amanda Balagur, is from the perspective of Michael W. Twitty, a food writer, culinary historian and historical interpreter. He gained international recognition through his writing, public talks and his food blog, Afroculinaria. He is also the author of The Cooking Gene, which won the 2018 James Beard Foundation Book Award for Book of the Year.

Twitty grew up in Washington D.C. and taught Hebrew school in that metro area for 15 years (he converted to Judaism at age 25). He is writing his second book, Kosher Soul, which focuses on his journey through the world of Jewish food as a Black American Jew, how Black Americans have affected Jewish food, the journey of Blacks and Jews in their own food worlds and how Black Jews have created their own foodways. He has published a

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‘Barefoot Contessa’ Ina Garten Says This is the Biggest Mistake Most People Make in Cooking

Food Network star Ina Garten is known for her down-to-earth persona and delicious dishes when it comes to cooking. As the host of Barefoot Contessa and author of various cookbooks, the culinary queen clearly knows her stuff when it comes to being a chef.

Though some recipes can be more intimidating than others, Garten revealed that both amateurs and professionals make this mistake when it comes to making meals.

Ina Garten of ‘Barefoot Contessa’ | Nathan Congleton/NBCU Photo Bank/NBCUniversal via Getty Images

‘Barefoot Contessa’s’ checklist on book-worthy recipes

With her plethora of best-selling cookbooks, Garten has learned which recipes are the best to share with fans. The culinary icon has a certain checklist she runs through with each potential dish with a focus on keeping it simple.

“There are a few things I’m always looking for,” the Barefoot Contessa host said, according to TheKitchn.com. “The first is, can

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What Is Soul Food? – What’s The Difference Between Soul And Southern Food?

Trying to differentiate soul food from Southern food shouldn’t be complicated. While not all Southern food is considered soul food, all soul food is definitely Southern.

Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African-Americans in the Southern United States. The expression “soul food” originated in the mid-1960s, when “soul” was a common word used to describe African-American culture. At its core, soul food is basic, down-home cooking that’s been passed down through many generations, with its roots in the rural South.

The staples of soul food cooking are beans, greens, cornmeal (used in cornbread, hush puppies, johnnycakes, and as a coating for fried fish), and pork. Pork has been almost limitless in a number of uses in soul food, from seasoning vegetables and stews to dehydrating and pickling staples like pork rinds and pig feet and ears. (Of course, my smoked meat of choice is turkey—and

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As a Lebanese refugee, cooking has become my lifeline and my community

When I’m eating delicious Lebanese food with my cookery class students, I can forget about all the pain. I feel loved. As a Lebanese chef currently in the UK, I know that sharing food is what makes us human.

There has been a long road between my old life in Lebanon and teaching cookery students in the UK. I was shot twice by a member of the Shia opposition during the internal conflict which broke out in Lebanon between the Sunni and Shia Muslims, and it left me paralysed for life. Through all the pain and uncertainty, cooking has become my lifeline here in the UK.

I was 24 years old the day I became paralysed. I was on my way to work a night shift. I was just opening my car when a man pointed a gun at me. I put my hands in the air and said, “I’m

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