How Canadian Food Buying And Cooking Habits Have Changed Due To Covid-19, According To Experts

Earlier this year, for many Canadians, grocery shopping shifted from a weekly routine to a gladiatorial sport. In the rush to stock up on goods at the grocery store in the early days of the pandemic, some consumers overbought or hoarded, panicked at the potential disruption in the supply chain. As sales moved online for many, the adjustments in purchasing habits in the household changed not only how we consume food, but the effects of our purchasing habits on the amount we waste.

Over the course of the last few years, food waste has been a prominent concern for the foodservice industry, as climate change and natural disasters have placed increasing strain on the world’s resources. Now, new research places some of that attention on food waste in the home, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic has changed buying and spending habits for the foreseeable future. 

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COVID-19 pandemic has changed how we shop for food

The days of driving to a supermarket for a package of hot dogs and a case of soda may be a thing of the past in the post-pandemic world.

In fact, it’s becoming a thing of the past right now at supermarket giant Kroger (KR). The company posted an impressive 127% second quarter surge in its digital sales as shoppers ordered online and either had groceries delivered straight to their homes or drove to a store and had packages put directly in their trunks. Triple-digit growth in digital food ordering was also seen at the likes of Target and Walmart in the second quarter, underscoring consumers growing more comfortable with online grocery shopping.

“There is no doubt people are shopping differently. People aren’t going to the stores as frequently. One of the things that, as part of our Restock Kroger initiative, we had made significant investments on our

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7 Ways the Pandemic Has Changed How We Shop for Food

When the coronavirus hit, even the most enthusiastic cooks had to adjust to a new, more complicated relationship with their kitchens.

For the first time in a generation, Americans began spending more money at the supermarket than at places where someone else made the food. Grocers saw eight years of projected sales growth packed into one month. Shopping trends that were in their infancy were turbocharged.

The six-month shift has been a behavioral scientist’s dream. Shoppers began by building bomb-shelter pantries. Then came a nostalgia phase, with bowls of Lucky Charms and boxes of Little Debbies offering throwback comfort. Soon, days were defined by elaborate culinary stunts, sourdough starter and kombucha clubs.

Although kitchen fatigue is setting in for many, a new set of kitchen habits have been set.

“People are moving on to more complex cooking, and we don’t see that going away,” said Rodney McMullen, chairman and

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