Here’s what’s new in fast food

If you felt like a new fried chicken sandwich debuted every day in January, you’re not far off.



a close up of a sandwich sitting on top of a table: Chick-fil-A's new grilled chicken sandwich.


© Chick-fil-A
Chick-fil-A’s new grilled chicken sandwich.

Some chains tried their best to slim down, while others did the exact opposite. The flurry of chicken sandwich additions are notable because several chains have eliminated a number of items over the past year to shed complexity and costs.

Loading...

Load Error

However, with a new year kicking off and sales on the rise once again, restaurants are doing all they can to sustain the growth after a bleak 2020.

Here’s what’s making their nationwide debuts on menus everywhere:

Boston Market

As if there weren’t enough options for a basic fried chicken sandwich, Boston Market is here to up the ante.

The Nashville Hot Crispy Chicken Sandwich is now being sold for a limited time, with a confident company saying that the “chicken sandwich

Read More

What’s the Best White Wine for Cooking? Here Are the Top Bottles (and How to Choose Them, According to 3 Food Pros)

You’re whipping up a classic chicken Marbella, and the Ina Garten recipe you’re following calls for “dry white wine.” You can’t exactly phone the Contessa herself, but come on, Ina: What the heck does that even mean? Pinot grigio is dry…but so is sauvignon blanc. What gives?

Cooking with wine can be totally confusing. While you might be tempted to grab whatever is hanging out in the back of your fridge, it actually does matter which bottle you choose—to an extent. We asked three food professionals (including a master sommelier, a chef and a nutrition director) to find out once and for all how to choose the best white wine for cooking.

1. Choose a white wine with high acidity and light fruit flavors

Celine Beitchman, director of nutrition at the Institute of Culinary Education, suggests a light- to medium-bodied white for cooking. “Unless you’re making a sweet

Read More

What Is Soul Food? – What’s The Difference Between Soul And Southern Food?

Trying to differentiate soul food from Southern food shouldn’t be complicated. While not all Southern food is considered soul food, all soul food is definitely Southern.

Soul food is an ethnic cuisine traditionally prepared and eaten by African-Americans in the Southern United States. The expression “soul food” originated in the mid-1960s, when “soul” was a common word used to describe African-American culture. At its core, soul food is basic, down-home cooking that’s been passed down through many generations, with its roots in the rural South.

The staples of soul food cooking are beans, greens, cornmeal (used in cornbread, hush puppies, johnnycakes, and as a coating for fried fish), and pork. Pork has been almost limitless in a number of uses in soul food, from seasoning vegetables and stews to dehydrating and pickling staples like pork rinds and pig feet and ears. (Of course, my smoked meat of choice is turkey—and

Read More