36 cooking myths you shouldn’t fall for


From washing raw chicken to throwing out bread that’s stale, there’s a lot of terrible cooking advice out there. Spanning the downright dangerous to the simply unhelpful, these are the cooking tips you should always ignore.



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If you’re using garlic, don’t ignore the recipe: if it calls for ground garlic, grind it; if it needs to be chopped, chop it. It’s important to follow instructions as the intensity and flavor of the garlic depends on how it’s prepped and cooked. Crushed garlic is more potent, while sliced or chopped is milder. Whole garlic cloves are the mildest, especially when roasted.



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These nourishing stews will get you through winter


As the days become shorter, it’s time to cook comforting, warming food, and what better than a nourishing stew. Simple to make and usually in just one pot, stews make great use of more economical cuts of meat and root vegetables. There’s little hands-on time, too. All the work is done by slow cooking. This selection of recipes has a stew for everyone, whether you prefer meat, poultry, fish or vegetarian. From rich, wine-laced French classics to light and spicy dishes, get cozy with a stew.



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Jena DeMoss: Debunked by the dietitian: common cooking myths solved! – Austin Daily Herald

By Jena DeMoss

Do you ever feel intimidated by all the “cooking rules” you’ve heard?  Some of the most common cooking claims you may have run across are simply not true.   With all the questions about food, cooking and nutrition I want to take some time to help “debunk” the top 10 myths most asked about in 2020.

MYTH: Cooking vegetables removes nutrients.

The truth: Only with boiling. The trick to retaining most nutrients, especially vitamin C and B vitamins, is to use as little water as possible and cook for a minimal amount of time. Steaming and microwaving, as well as dry-heat methods like grilling, roasting and stir-frying, retain the most nutrients.

MYTH: Salting pasta or potato water makes it boil faster.

The truth: Adding salt makes the water hotter but it’s not going to boil any faster. The reason to add salt is to season the food, not

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How to cook lentils and choose the right variety for your recipe

Other cultures seem to have a better grip on how wonderful lentils are, especially in India, where dal (the term can refer to the lentils themselves or the dish made with them) is a staple. “The French also do pretty nice things with lentils,” Dragonwagon says. Lentils do in fact have a lot going for them, including being packed with protein, cheap and nonperishable. They’re also incredibly versatile.

“They’re sort of like Cinderella when she has the cinders all over,” Dragonwagon says. “We get to be the fairy godmothers to give her the pumpkin carriage and the pretty dress.”

So how do you best bring the magic to these little powerhouses? Read on.

The basics. In “On Food and Cooking,” Harold McGee says that lentils are probably the oldest cultivated legume. He also explains another fun bit of trivia: The Latin word for lentil is “lens,” which, yes, is what

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